Pierre Corneille Quotes

It is an imprudence common to kings to listen to too much advice and to err in their choice.
Pierre Corneille (1606-1684), French playwright. King Ptolemy, in The Death of Pompey (La Mort de Pompée), act 4, sc. 1 (1642).
Such subjects are the very strength of kings, and are thus above the law.
Pierre Corneille (1606-1684), French playwright. King Tullus, in Horace, act 5, sc. 3 (1641). King Tullus forgives the hero Horace, who has saved the state but killed his sister.
Your virtue raises your glory above your crime.
Pierre Corneille (1606-1684), French playwright. King Tullus, in Horace, act 5, sc. 3 (1641). King Tullus forgives the hero Horace, who has saved the state but killed his sister.
I would not like a king who could obey.
Pierre Corneille (1606-1684), French playwright. Laodice, in Nicomède, act 3, sc. 2 (1651).
The king, just and prudent, wants only those things which he can get.
Pierre Corneille (1606-1684), French playwright. Laodice, in Nicomède, act 1, sc. 2 (1651).
Have others fear you, and I will have no fear.
Pierre Corneille (1606-1684), French playwright. Laodice to her beloved, in Nicomède, act 1, sc. 1 (1651).
Clemency is the noblest trait which can reveal a true monarch to the world.
Pierre Corneille (1606-1684), French playwright. Livia, in Cinna, act 4, sc. 3 (1641). Livia urges her husband, Augustus, to pardon conspirators.
Guess if you can and choose if you dare.
Pierre Corneille (1606-1684), French playwright. Léontine, in Héraclius, act 4, sc. 4 (1647). Léontine describes the dilemma of a character's unknown identity.
After having won a scepter, few are so generous as to disdain the pleasures of ruling.
Pierre Corneille (1606-1684), French playwright. Maximus, in Cinna, act 2, sc. 1 (1641).
A true king is neither husband nor father; he considers his throne and nothing else.
Pierre Corneille (1606-1684), French playwright. Nicomède, in Nicomède, act 4, sc. 3 (1651).