(10 December 1830 – 15 May 1886 / Amherst / Massachusetts)

A Bird Came Down

A bird came down the walk:
He did not know I saw;
He bit an angle-worm in halves
And ate the fellow, raw.

And then he drank a dew
From a convenient grass,
And then hopped sidewise to the wall
To let a beetle pass.

He glanced with rapid eyes
That hurried all abroad,-
They looked like frightened beads, I thought;
He stirred his velvet head

Like one in danger; cautious,
I offered him a crumb,
And he unrolled his feathers
And rowed him softer home

Than oars divide the ocean,
Too silver for a seam,
Or butterflies, off banks of noon,
Leap, splashless, as they swim.

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Comments (69)

there need to be tuna fish poems
great 10+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
superb and great He glanced with rapid eyes That hurried all abroad, - They looked like frightened beads, I thought; He stirred his velvet head
Then what a style to bring to the readers mind's eye the elegant, smooth graceful flight of this bird as it escaped to safety...in the last verse! . Amazingly gifted with words this Emily yah! ! ! !
A characteristic Emily Dickinson poem, as she frequently wrote about her observances of nature.
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