A Love By The Sea

Out of the starless night that covers me,
(O tribulation of the wind that rolls!)
Black as the cloud of some tremendous spell,
The susurration of the sighing sea
Sounds like the sobbing whisper of two souls
That tremble in a passion of farewell.

To the desires that trebled life in me,
(O melancholy of the wind that rolls!)
The dreams that seemed the future to foretell,
The hopes that mounted herward like the sea,
To all the sweet things sent on happy souls,
I cannot choose but bid a mute farewell.

And to the girl who was so much to me
(O lamentation of this wind that rolls!)
Since I may not the life of her compel,
Out of the night, beside the sounding sea,
Full of the love that might have blent our souls,
A sad, a last, a long, supreme farewell.

by William Ernest Henley

Comments (14)

Here is the answer to my question asked earlier. http: //courses.wcupa.edu/fletcher/henley/orig.htm
Out of the starless night that covers me put me off my gait. Actually it kind of startled me since this is, minus the word starless, is the opening line of Invictus. I really couldn't give the poem a thoughtful reading with that on my mind, Was this poem written before or after Invictus.
Sounds like the sobbing whisper of two souls That tremble in a passion of farewell. we learn from all the old and famous poets who gave us these gifts of poems. tony
this poem serving as a source of lament and grief for Henley's deceased daughter is impactful and really resonates with me
The susurration of the sighing sea Sounds like the sobbing whisper of two souls That tremble in a passion of farewell.- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -Has there ever been a better use of the word susurration? ? ? ? Has there ever been a more beautiful image? ? ? ? Love this classic poet.
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