FB (1925 / Chicago)

A Photo Of An Old Grave (Courtesy Of Danny Reynolds)

A PHOTO OF AN OLD GRAVE (Courtesy of Danny Reynolds)

This was once
a very grand grave,
Very, very, old,
but still standing.

Surrounded
by carved stone fencing,
headed off
by an ornate Gothic cross.

But now unattended
for scores of years,
there is a new mourner.

Inside the rectangle,
a tree has sprouted,
and been allowed to grow.

The main stem, erupting
from where the head would lay.
The roots drawing
from the nutrients below.

When I look at this scene,
I feel pity and joy in equal parts,
as I sense both neglect
...and resurrection.

So.
Do graveyards need a license
for their poet-magnets?

Fred Babbin

User Rating: 3,5 / 5 ( 9 votes ) 11

Comments (11)

Love the image here. Life is rooted in death. I'd like an apple tree on me, please. -chuck
Fred, Thank you for the comment on my poem, this is my first day on this site and everyone is very nice. I just read this poem 'A PHOTO OF AN OLD GRAVE' And i truly enjoyed your writing style.i will certainly be reading more of your musings. Barbie
Great ending (as I sense both neglect /...and resurrection.) I once tried to release an old, small cemetery from its overgrown weeds, invading tree limbs, etc. In searching for genealogical information I have also come across a tree wrapped around a grave stone (It was so big) and actually more plants and trees than graves. There is so much art (Celtic cross) and so many stories hidden in those old cemeteries. You are contributing to our greater appreciation of the past with this poem. We should take time to look more carefully and see what’s really there.
'Do graveyards need a license for their poet-magnets? ' Enjoyed this beautiful ending.
A really atmospheric poem Fred, great work. Best wishes, Andrew
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