An Apprehension

Poem By Elizabeth Barrett Browning

IF all the gentlest-hearted friends I know
Concentred in one heart their gentleness,
That still grew gentler till its pulse was less
For life than pity,--I should yet be slow
To bring my own heart nakedly below
The palm of such a friend, that he should press
Motive, condition, means, appliances,

My false ideal joy and fickle woe,
Out full to light and knowledge; I should fear
Some plait between the brows, some rougher chime
In the free voice. O angels, let your flood
Of bitter scorn dash on me ! do ye hear
What I say who hear calmly all the time
This everlasting face to face with GOD ?

Comments about An Apprehension

That still grew gentler till its pulse was less For life than pity, - I should yet be slow, ........ well done
Another magnificent poem from one of the most accomplished poets of all time.
My false ideal joy and fickle woe, Out full to light and knowledge; I should fear Some plait between the brows, some rougher chime In the free voice. O angels, let your flood Of bitter scorn dash on me! do ye hear What I say who hear calmly all the time This everlasting face to face with GOD? - - - - - -It is faith in divine power or the true knowledge that makes one calm in the face of all hurdles.
Beautiful creation. Amazing poem.
Such a great poem by Elizabeth Barrett Browning....


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