An Hymn To The Evening

Poem By Phillis Wheatley

SOON as the sun forsook the eastern main
The pealing thunder shook the heav'nly plain;
Majestic grandeur! From the zephyr's wing,
Exhales the incense of the blooming spring.
Soft purl the streams, the birds renew their notes,
And through the air their mingled music floats.
Through all the heav'ns what beauteous dies are
spread!
But the west glories in the deepest red:
So may our breasts with ev'ry virtue glow,
The living temples of our God below!
Fill'd with the praise of him who gives the light,
And draws the sable curtains of the night,
Let placid slumbers sooth each weary mind,
At morn to wake more heav'nly, more refin'd;
So shall the labours of the day begin
More pure, more guarded from the snares of sin.
Night's leaden sceptre seals my drowsy eyes,

Comments about An Hymn To The Evening

this is so fun and good wow man
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Phillis Wheatley, So much is the splendor and workings of our God. Hymn to the evening was lovely and descriptive and brought a wonderful spirit of rejoicing to my heart. thank you so much for reminding me of how intricated His ways really are. I liked the line, So may our breasts with every virtue glow., the living temples of our God below.PS Also incredible Old English. Loved it! ...........................................Blessings to you............................Kathy
a calming piece...beautifully written for a woman in her times


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