Anemone

Poem By Rod Mendieta

A Leviathan of an anemone
Shot its tentacle and down did look
From the high celestial dome.
But I wield the sword and the crook
And never will conform.

The feeler stuck onto my skull
Hoping to subdue my unwary mind
But my blade is never dull
And assuredly my herd and my kind
Will be rid of his black gall.

The humble shepherd cried:
‘Though abysmal and insatiable his hunger
We shall outlive the wile of the warmonger'.

Echoed the old warrior's pride:
‘Not one inch shall fall of this honored lair
Even though our courage hangs threadbare! '

Comments about Anemone

(cont.) .. ** Google time: Definition of anemone 1: any of a large genus (Anemone) of perennial herbs of the buttercup family having lobed or divided leaves and showy flowers without petals but with conspicuous sepals — called also windflower 2: sea anemone [this HAS tentacles] bri :)
i'm baffled, JUST like i am at home! because i can make neither head nor tail NOR tentacle out of this use of anemone **, i'm taking the wildest of guesses: could you have misspelled (an) enemy as anemone? ? ? ? (cont.)


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