Ballad Of The Moon

translated by Will Kirkland

The moon came into the forge
in her bustle of flowering nard.

by Federico García Lorca Click to read full poem

Comments (22)

Shadows of Yeats lost child but a more mature life stage still the perplexing good and bad and price to pay for the joy
it was good and i really really like it
U cant see me Cuz im John Cena
tasted like 2 chicken tikka masala and one Balti chicken with a side order of poppadoms doot
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Moon and child climbing through the sky. The sweet innocence protected by most beautiful and adventurous figure, queen of sky. Lovely poem.
Part 1==This is the first poem in his book and it sets the tone and also signals the role of the moon and other natural elements in the book. The moon comes into the smithy dressed as a woman, and dances lasciviously in front of a little boy, casting a spell on the boy through rhyme and repetition: [see reference below]
Part 2==“The boy is entranced but warns the moon that she must flee before the gypsies return or they will chop her up for necklaces and silver rings, typical gypsy jewelry. The words that he uses to caution the moon are incantatory, “Run away, moon, run away, moon.” [see reference below]
Part 3==The moon, however, refuses to be frightened and answers the boy with her own prediction: When the gypsies come, they will find you on the anvil with your tiny eyes shut. Enthralled, the boy draws near. A rider is heard galloping across the plain, and in the smithy the boy’s eyes are shut.[see reference below]
Part 4== A barn owl hoots, and through the sky goes the moon, taking a boy by the hand. The boy’s body lies inside the smithy, but his spirit has gone with the moon. The gypsies, upon discovering their loss, commence to wail and shout. Outside, the air, this time a sympathetic element of nature, watches over them. [see reference below]
Part 5==There are many stories in Greek and Roman mythology of the moon descending to the earth to capture a young man and take him away. García Lorca created a modern mythology for his gypsies, weaving strands of ancient tales and local Andalusian culture.- -www.enotes.com/topics/ballad-moon-moon
Your reproduction of this poem has some serious spelling errors, such as: amrs, feelheir, and veiwing.
To quote it like this as if there I turned, and saw her stand like a lady in a ballad leaning after me in the moonlight ..............it's so beautiful I would like to read it again again.......also very insightful.........thanks for sharing
Beautiful poem. Nice presentation.
Such a brilliant poem by Federico Garcia Lorca👍👍👍
How the night owl calls! ! Thanks for sharing this poem with us.