(31 May 1819 - 26 March 1892 / New York / United States)

Adlestrop

Yes, I remember Adlestrop --
The name, because one afternoon
Of heat the express-train drew up there
Unwontedly. It was late June.

The steam hissed. Someone cleared his throat.
No one left and no one came
On the bare platform. What I saw
Was Adlestrop -- only the name

And willows, willow-herb, and grass,
And meadowsweet, and haycocks dry,
No whit less still and lonely fair
Than the high cloudlets in the sky.

And for that minute a blackbird sang
Close by, and round him, mistier,
Farther and farther, all the birds
Of Oxfordshire and Gloucestershire.

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Other poems of THOMAS (94)

Comments (5)

The Call to War seems to be an aphrodisiac to some men... probably young men who want to prove their bravery on a battlefield that they are sure they will march away from at the end of the day because youth think life immortal- Whitman you speak truth
The poem is talking about how a flag is beckoning men to ships before a war. It also seems that the flag is compared to a woman, but i don't quite understand that. Maybe it is that men are attracted to women, and the flag is attracting men to war. Also the poem seems to be joyous over the fact of preparing for war, which i don't understand either, sorry to all who read this, i wish i could analyze this better.
hes comparing a us flag during war to a womans characteristics.
In this poem Whitman seems to be comparing women to a flag that has been through many wars and battles. Some women wear lots of perfume and he may be comparing that to a flag that has been through many battles and is probably torn and ragged but still flies high.
I'm sure there is some deeper meaning that I'm missing but from the outside it seems that he is comparing women and war. I'm sure some how that is supposed to be complimentary but I don't see it.