Be Still, My Soul, Be Still

Poem By Alfred Edward Housman

Be still, my soul, be still; the arms you bear are brittle,
Earth and high heaven are fixt of old and founded strong.
Think rather,-- call to thought, if now you grieve a little,
The days when we had rest, O soul, for they were long.

Men loved unkindness then, but lightless in the quarry
I slept and saw not; tears fell down, I did not mourn;
Sweat ran and blood sprang out and I was never sorry:
Then it was well with me, in days ere I was born.

Now, and I muse for why and never find the reason,
I pace the earth, and drink the air, and feel the sun.
Be still, be still, my soul; it is but for a season:
Let us endure an hour and see injustice done.

Ay, look: high heaven and earth ail from the prime foundation;
All thoughts to rive the heart are here, and all are vain:
Horror and scorn and hate and fear and indignation--
Oh why did I awake? when shall I sleep again?

Comments about Be Still, My Soul, Be Still

Human feeling in such beautiful way here created into a poem and nice.
......if only we could have peace for everyone...then life would truly be a dream....
its a good flawless poem
Alfred Edward Housman, a scholar of great note, a man who felt so deeply, and on this page he wrote, of the surging tide of feeling, that hemmed him to the ground, ah, what a man was Housman, who lives on his renown.
1] Let us endure an hour and see injustice done. 2] Oh why did I awake? when shall I sleep again? 3] Be still, my soul, be still; the arms you bear are brittle, Earth and high heaven are fixt of old and founded strong. Much perhaps to bag the coins for our journey. Nice put.


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