Good Morrow

I wonder, by my truth, what thou and I
Did, till we loved; were we not weaned till then,
But sucked on country pleasures, childishly?
Or snorted we in the Seven Sleepers' den?
'Twas so; but this, all pleasures fancies be.
If ever any beauty I did see,
Which I desired, and got, 'twas but a dream of thee.

And now good morrow to our waking souls,
Which watch not one another out of fear;
For love, all love of other sights controls,
And makes one little room, an everywhere.
Let sead discoveries to new worlds have gone,
Let maps to others, worlds on worlds have shown,
Let us possess our world; each hath one and is one.

My face in thine eye, thine in mine appears,
And true plain hearts do in the faces rest;
Where can we find two better hemispheres,
Without sharp North, without declining West?
Whatever dies, was not mixed equally;
If our two loves be one; or thou and I
Love so alike that none do slacken, none can die.

by John Donne

Comments (3)

this could be end of journey...sweet sleep
Anne of Greene Gables was my very first classic read at age nine, too, Kim, and was fascinating to envision the lives of Lucy's characters.... And I agree with you about this poem as well. It is sweet, but nothing like her story telling....
Her poetry is good, but not as good as her books. As a child I loved her book THE GOLDEN ROAD and all the girls in town loved ANNE OF GREEN GABLES and the other books in that series. One of my favorites parts of THE GOLDEN ROAD was a line that went something like this: My uncle felt all right when he went to bed, but when he woke up he was dead. That has influenced my sense of humor ever since.