Evening Saudade

I now know everything there is to know
about the individual parts that comprise the whole—
unlike the birds outside that look up and therefore fly
or the raccoons that climb from the tree at dusk to eat
thinking nothing of the waxing moon.
I am no longer a child who catches grasshoppers and grand-
daddy longlegs, who follows the track of a June bug
and gallops home for dinner with the family dog.
Getting up reminds me of the hip and the knee, the burden
of carrying a body through a day of dishes and laundry.
This gravity contrasts instinct, the weight of insect wings.
A smooth glass of chardonnay cools my parched mouth
as I watch a tired sun sink into her wrinkled sheets,
thinking nothing of the waxing moon.

by Pamela Sinicrope

Comments (2)

This is a quiet, sincere and genuine poem about the necessity of assessing Who We Are and Where We Are without illusions or self-deception or futile clinging to a lost past. The spirit of this poem is so truthful it is immediately convincing. And that spirit is expressed in beautiful language with an underlying good humor about our human disposition to resist change and deny aging. The imagery from nature is precise and persuasive. I would call this a Poem of TAO, it's that holistic and honest.
love it...........................................................................