Faintheart In A Railway Train

Poem By Thomas Hardy

At nine in the morning there passed a church,
At ten there passed me by the sea,
At twelve a town of smoke and smirch,
At two a forest of oak and birch,
And then, on a platform, she:

A radiant stranger, who saw not me.
I queried, 'Get out to her do I dare?'
But I kept my seat in my search for a plea,
And the wheels moved on. O could it but be
That I had alighted there!

Comments about Faintheart In A Railway Train

Or, as Tom Waits said, I Hope That I Don’t Fall In Love With You.
Having ridden on many trains, the concise poem appeals to me. Different scenes at different times of day. Then to see an attractive woman at a station. I would have been too shy also to disembark at the station where she was. Hardy at his best in this poem.
I love this poem I'm using it for my homework I like it because it's interesting


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Other poems of HARDY

"I Said To Love"

I said to Love,
"It is not now as in old days
When men adored thee and thy ways
   All else above;

A Broken Appointment

You did not come,
And marching Time drew on, and wore me numb.
Yet less for loss of your dear presence there
Than that I thus found lacking in your make

"Between Us Now"

Between us now and here -
   Two thrown together
Who are not wont to wear
   Life's flushest feather -

"How Great My Grief" (Triolet)

How great my grief, my joys how few,
Since first it was my fate to know thee!
- Have the slow years not brought to view
How great my grief, my joys how few,

I Need Not Go

I need not go
Through sleet and snow
To where I know
She waits for me;

A Meeting With Despair

AS evening shaped I found me on a moor
Which sight could scarce sustain:
The black lean land, of featureless contour,
Was like a tract in pain.