From A Railway Carriage

Faster than fairies, faster than witches,
Bridges and houses, hedges and ditches;
And charging along like troops in a battle
All through the meadows the horses and cattle:
All of the sights of the hill and the plain
Fly as thick as driving rain;
And ever again, in the wink of an eye,
Painted stations whistle by.
Here is a child who clambers and scrambles,
All by himself and gathering brambles;
Here is a tramp who stands and gazes;
And here is the green for stringing the daisies!
Here is a cart runaway in the road
Lumping along with man and load;
And here is a mill, and there is a river:
Each a glimpse and gone forever!

by Robert Louis Stevenson

Comments (13)

I liked this poem
Ydhwgjxkxkck kk
I like this poem simple and very nice.
This poem is brilliant. it feels like one is on the train.
Extraordinary speed implied so...so skilfully within space between words, Marvelous. Lucidity the main criteria to communicate the flying expression...may it be the conscious withdrawal from the existing material world. Unique and unique forever. Pranab k c
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