FH ( / San Francisco, CA)

Geoffrey Chaucer, The Canterbury Tales: General Prologue 20, The Miller - (Forrest Hainline's Minimalist Translation)

Geoffrey Chaucer, The Canterbury Tales: General Prologue 20, The Miller - (Forrest Hainline's Minimalist Translation)

542 There was also a Reeve and a Miller,
543 A Summoner and a Pardoner also,
544 A Manciple, and myself, - there were no more.

545 The Miller was a stout carl for the nonce;
546 Full big he was of brawn, and eek of bones.
547 That proved well, for over all there he came,
548 At wrestling he would have always the ram.
549 He was short-shouldered, broad, a thick knar;
550 There was no door that he could not heave off har,
551 Or break it at a running with his head.
552 His beard as any sow or fox was red,
553 And thereto broad as it were a spade.
554 Upon the top right of his nose he had
555 A wart, and thereon stood a tuft of hairs,
556 Red as the bristles of a sow's ears;
557 His nostrils black were and wide.
558 A sword and a buckler bore he by his side.
559 His mouth as great was as a great furnace.
560 He was a jangler and a goliardeys,
561 And that was most of sin and harlotries.
562 Well could he steal corn toll threes;
563 And yet he had a thumb of gold, pardie.
564 A white cope and a blue hood wore he.
565 A bagpipe well could he blow and sound,
566 And therewithal he brought us out of town.

© 2009,2019 Forrest Hainline

User Rating: 5 / 5 ( 0 votes )

Other poems of HAINLINE (432)

Comments (0)

There is no comment submitted by members.