FH ( / San Francisco, CA)

Geoffrey Chaucer, The Canterbury Tales: General Prologue 22, The Reeve - (Forrest Hainline's Minimalist Translation)

Geoffrey Chaucer, The Canterbury Tales: General Prologue 22, The Reeve - (Forrest Hainline's Minimalist Translation)

587 The Reeve was a slender choleric man.
588 His beard was shaved as nigh as ever he can;
589 His hair was by his ears full round shorn;
590 His top was docked like a priest before.
591 Full long were his legs and full leen,
592 Like a staff; there was no calf seen.
593 Well could he keep a garner and bin;
594 There was no auditor could on him win.
595 Well wist he by the drought and by the rain
596 The yielding of his seed and of his grain.
597 His lord's sheep, his neet, his dairy,
598 Was wholly in this Reeve's governing,
600 And by his covenant gave the reckoning,
601 Since that his lord was twenty year of age.
602 There could no man bring him in arrearage.
603 There's no bailiff, no herder, no other hine,
604 That he not knew his sleight and his covine;
605 They were adread of him as of the death.
606 His dwelling was full fair upon the heath,
607 With green trees shaded was his place.
608 He could better than his lord purchase.
609 Full rich he was astored privily.
610 His lord well could he please subtlely,
611 To give and lend him of his own good,
612 And have a thank, and yet a coat and hood.
613 In youth he had learned a good mister:
614 He was a well good wright, a carpenter.
615 This Reeve sat upon a full good stot
616 That was all pomely grey, and called Scot.
617 A long surcoat of perse upon him hade,
618 And by his side he bore a rusty blade.
619 Of Norfolk was this Reeve of which I tell,
620 Beside a town men call Baldeswell.
621 Tucked he was as is a friar about,
622 And ever he rode the hindmost of our route.

© 2009,2019 Forrest Hainline

User Rating: 5 / 5 ( 0 votes )

Other poems of HAINLINE (432)

Comments (0)

There is no comment submitted by members.