PPH (1996-1920 / )

Gilligan

I was thinking about which character Jesus would
be if he were on Gilligan’s Island. I know what
you’re going to say – he would be the Professor,
right? Well, that’s the obvious choice and that’s
what I thought at first, but now I’m not so sure.

I actually think he would be Maryann, who is
so innocent and friendly to everyone. She is down-to-
earth, earnest and helpful and easily the most
likeable one on the island.

I was also thinking Jesus could be Gilligan. I know,
I know, you’re shaking your head vigorously. But
hear me out. Gilligan tries to do the right thing but
is always getting ostracized by everyone else. His
heart is in the right place but he doesn’t get
acknowledged for that, just like Jesus. The main
drawback to that theory is that I just can’t picture
Jesus wearing that dumb floppy white hat or
getting chewed out by the Skipper all the time.

User Rating: 2,0 / 5 ( 3 votes ) 4

Comments (4)

You continue to amaze me with each of your pieces. I can't help but to be awed by the combined humor and intelligence of your thoughts. And I think what is equally as impressive is that each reads as if the thoughts just come spewing out and that little work is involved. Perhaps you should consider the sale of your work to a stand-up comedienne. It's already better than most.
When I really am ready to have my head spun around (and need my demons exorcized) I return to your work. William Blake said Lucifer was more interesting than God in 'Paradise Lost' because Milton, being a true poet, was of the party of the Devil. Hey, in the Book of Job, the poet makes it perfectly clear that Satan and God were old buddies who enjoyed a friendly bet. Well, this spun my head around. I'm pretty sure you're on the side of Good, I'm just not quite sure what side that is. Congratulations on making me think - a difficult task, I don't like to do it. Sometimes I'm in the mood. Thanks. We all enjoy a good joke. Except for those who don't like poetry.
Good provoking piece, Hound. I like the idea of fitting a character into another and yet we can only do so whithin the realms of our imagination. From the closing lines, even that proves limited. There is a great laid back feel to this piece, almost as if you were Jesus himself presenting us with a puzzle.
I don't know Prof. I can't see him in the floppy hat but as far as MaryAnn goes, I can't see him having boobs and gams that stretch for a mile. I thought I had a fertile imagination but when I compare mine to yours I feel like the little leaguer pitching to the babe. Fun Stuff