Imitated From Ossian

Poem By Samuel Taylor Coleridge

The stream with languid murmur creeps,
In Lumin's flowery vale:
Beneath the dew the Lily weeps
Slow-waving to the gale.

'Cease, restless gale! 'it seems to say,
'Nor wake me with thy sighing!
The honours of my vernal day
On rapid wing are flying.

Tomorrow shall the Traveller come
Who late beheld me blooming:
His searching eye shall vainly roam
The dreary vale of Lumin.'

With eager gaze and wetted cheek
My wonted haunts along,
Thus, faithful Maiden! thou shalt seek
The Youth of simplest song.

But I along the breeze shall roll
The voice of feeble power;
And dwell, the Moon-beam of thy soul,
In Slumber's nightly hour.

Comments about Imitated From Ossian

But I along the breeze shall roll The voice of feeble power; A nice poem.
is he saying, 'The more complex the song, the more feeble its power'?
Such a heartwarming poem.......
But I along the breeze shall roll The voice of feeble power; And dwell, the Moon-beam of thy soul, In Slumber's nightly hour. Coleridge with the moon beam of his soul power.
Beneath the dew the Lily weeps! Thanks for sharing this poem with us.


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