Jenny Kissed Me

Poem By James Henry Leigh Hunt

Jenny kissed me when we met,
Jumping from the chair she sat in;
Time, you thief, who love to get
Sweets into your list, put that in!
Say I'm weary, say I'm sad,
Say that health and wealth have missed me,
Say I'm growing old, but add,
Jenny kissed me.

Comments about Jenny Kissed Me

A simple poem that creates all the right feelings. Happiness. nostalgia, longing for the innocent times I envy my Grandchildren for because they have them ahead.
Time, you thief, who love to get Sweets into your list, put that in! explicit desires how lucky Jenny did kiss you
This poem was in a collection my father had, and. it captivated me when I first read it, especially the last few lines. Every once in awhile it comes back into my consciousness - like today when I looked it up on this website. Now, like another poster, I'm growing old... in my early 70s... but I have a daughter Jenny... who kissed me! ; -) [This poem played a role in why I agreed with my wife that Jennifer would be a good name for our younger daughter.]
I cannot remember the exact story behind this poem but as best as I can remember it commemorates a moment when Leigh Hunt, the poet, who had been quite ill, visits the family of his friend, another poet whose name I don’t recall, and is greeted in the manner he recounts by the poets wife, Jenny, normally a rather reserved and cold person but whom in this moment of happy relief, seeing their friend recovered, casts aside her usual inhibitions and kisses him in joy at his survival.
Jenny is my adorable grandaughter, Chera, who jumped up from her chair and kissed me when she saw me.


Rating Card

3,2 out of 5
60 total ratings

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