Journey's End

Poem By John Ronald Reuel Tolkien

In western lands beneath the Sun
The flowers may rise in Spring,
The trees may bud, the waters run,
The merry finches sing.
Or there maybe 'tis cloudless night,
And swaying branches bear
The Elven-stars as jewels white
Amid their branching hair.

Though here at journey's end I lie
In darkness buried deep,
Beyond all towers strong and high,
Beyond all mountains steep,
Above all shadows rides the Sun
And Stars for ever dwell:
I will not say the Day is done,
Nor bid the Stars farewell.

Comments about Journey's End

'I will not say the day is done, Nor bid the stars good-bye' you're not beaten until you stop trying always believe in the right
No - it was sung by Samwise Gamgee in the tower at Cirith Ungol. 'And then suddenly new strength rose in him, and his voice rang out, while words of his own came unbidden to fit the simple tune.' (Lord of the Rings, book six, chapter 1 'The Tower of Cirith Ungol.')
This is a poem by Bilbo, written at the end of the Hobbit.


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