At A Solemn Music

Blest pair of Sirens, pledges of Heav'n's joy,
Sphere-born harmonious Sisters, Voice and Verse,
Wed your divine sounds, and mixt power employ
Dead things with inbreath'd sense able to pierce,
And to our high-rais'd fantasy present
That undisturbed Song of pure concent,
Ay sung before that saphire-colour'd throne
To Him that sits thereon
With Saintly shout and solemn Jubilee,
Where the bright Seraphim in burning row
Their loud up-lifted Angel trumpets blow,
And the Cherubic host in thousand choirs
Touch their immortal Harps of golden wires,
With those just Spirits that wear victorious Palms,
Hymns devout and holy Psalms
Singing everlastingly;
That we on Earth with undiscording voice
May rightly answer that melodious noise;
As once we did, till disproportion'd sin
Jarr'd against Nature's chime, and with harsh din
Broke the fair music that all creatures made
To their great Lord, whose love their motion sway'd
In first obedience, and their state of good.
And keep in tune with Heav'n, till God ere long
To His celestial consort us unite,
To live with Him, and sing in endless morn of light.

by John Milton

Comments (32)

ps, Haven't had tears of laughter in a long time! And this is Perfect for Such! ! ! Thank You Poem Hunter for having This! ! !
Simply Precious! ! ! Wonderfully done! ! ! (Yes!) Very Humorous! ! ! Love! ! !
I need help.... I fell off my chair laughing. I haven't had such fun in a long time. I will not analyze, I will not ponder, I will not examine rhythm or rhyme. Mine is just to read and enjoy! ! !
Brilliant write.....will funny!
It would be sexist to imagine that there can only be inordinately male-dominated relationships. This piece, in the vein of Carroll's humor, envisions an inordinately female-dominated relationship, and what the perspective of the man who lives within that relationship might be of his physically dominant partner. There is also, if I am inferring correctly, the suggestion that there is so much more to a person than that which we initially see when we enter into a relationship, and it is not always apparent what will unfold in the future. I know not enough of Carroll's other writings to intelligently conclude anything about his view of women as a whole. The character of this piece's female subject is not un-reminiscent of the Red Queen. If this is an ongoing pattern in his other works, then I would have to conclude that Mr. Carroll did have a pathologic (purposefully employed) view of women.
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