Passage

Poem By Edward Lemond

He clings to him full-body,
His face buried in the mane.
One of his legs is thrown over

The far side of the horse,
The other is bent, with the knee
Down and the foot on the rump,

The heel pointing away. He is naked.
His skin is the same golden white
As the horse's. His hair is the same

Black as the thicket of trees
In the background, which is blurry,
With patches of sun falling through.

The horse stands in belly-deep water
Near the edge of a pond, his eye
Open, his muzzle almost touching

The water. The man's long arm
Lies across the muscular shoulder.
His face is pressed into the neck.

He does not want ever to let go.
He is in bliss. The horse feels
The man on his back, and the hot tears.

Comments about Passage

There is no comment submitted by members.


Rating Card

5 out of 5
0 total ratings

Other poems of LEMOND

A Mystery To Him

What she thought of all he'd just said
Would remain a mystery, as so much
About her remained a mystery to him,

Beauty Was Everywhere

I may have stood there for an hour,
In water up to my knees, watching
The sun go down. Boats moved

Born To Water

How can anything born to water
Look so drowned? Your sad eye,
Half closed, sees nothing.

Poetry Slam

By the foot of the bed,
from memory, I recite
D'Invilliers' quatrain.
“Then wear the gold hat”

My Father

When my father was alive,
We had very little to say
To each other, but now