Poet's Mood

Poem By Beaumont and Fletcher

Hence, all you vain delights,
As short as are the nights
Wherein you spend your folly!
There's nought in this life sweet,
If man were wise to see it,
But only melancholy;
Oh, sweetest melancholy!
Welcome folded arms, and fixed eyes,
A sigh that piercing mortifies,
A look that's fastened to the ground,
A tongue chained up, without a sound!
Fountain-head and pathless groves,
Places which pale passion loves!
Moonlight walks, when all the fowls
Are warmly housed, save bats and owls!
A midnight bell, a parting groan!
These are the sounds we feed upon;
Then stretch our bones in a still gloomy valley:
Nothing's so dainty sweet as lovely melancholy.

Comments about Poet's Mood

Great poem, line and metre excellent
moonlight walks, I loved the personification
A look! ! ! ! With fixed eyes. Thanks for sharing this poem with us.
A grand presentation of a poet's mood along with the undercurrents responsible for the same. A true classic poem.
The best appreciation given to melancholy ... never I read this kind ... it’s heart touching poem


Rating Card

3,4 out of 5
31 total ratings

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