An Enigma

"Seldom we find," says Solomon Don Dunce,
"Half an idea in the profoundest sonnet.
Through all the flimsy things we see at once
As easily as through a Naples bonnet-
Trash of all trash!- how can a lady don it?
Yet heavier far than your Petrarchan stuff-
Owl-downy nonsense that the faintest puff
Twirls into trunk-paper the while you con it."
And, veritably, Sol is right enough.
The general tuckermanities are arrant
Bubbles- ephemeral and so transparent-
But this is, now- you may depend upon it-
Stable, opaque, immortal- all by dint
Of the dear names that he concealed within 't.

by Edgar Allan Poe

Comments (7)

I salute the architect! A great poem, a classic! No words can be enough to describe this master piece.
He prayeth well, who loveth well Both man and bird and beast. He prayeth best, who loveth best All things both great and small; For the dear God who loveth us, He made and loveth all. I salute this great poet.
One of the best narrative poems ever written in English, this lost nothing by being brought to the attention of hundreds of thousands of adolescents in the anthology THE NARRATIVE ART IN VERSE.
Undoubtedly the most influential narrative poem of my teenage years. Though we had to 'study' it for an exam, it was in that wonderful anthology THE NARRATIVE ART IN VERSE - sometimes maligned by 'the trendies'. As Janet put it in her 2004 posting, 'Brilliant. An all-time favourite.'
A brilliant weave of Gods/ Goddesses in the architecture of this poem
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