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Sonnet 141: In Faith, I Do Not Love Thee With Mine Eyes
William Shakespeare (26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

Sonnet 141: In Faith, I Do Not Love Thee With Mine Eyes

In faith, I do not love thee with mine eyes,
For they in thee a thousand errors note;
But 'tis my heart that loves what they despise,
Who in despite of view is pleased to dote.
Nor are mine cars with thy tongue's tune delighted,
Nor tender feeling to base touches prone,
Nor taste, nor smell, desire to be invited
To any sensual feast with thee alone;
But my five wits, nor my five senses can
Dissuade one foolish heart from serving thee,
Who leaves unswayed the likeness of a man,
Thy proud heart's slave and vassal wretch to be.
Only my plague thus far I count my gain,
That she that makes me sin awards me pain.

User Rating: 3,3 / 5 ( 30 votes ) 9

Comments (9)

Beautiful rendition of words to utmost justice. Well penned with spiritual insight.
Superb and fantastic poem
10+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
There seems to be a misprint here. In line five shouldn't the word be 'ears' instead of 'cars'?
***** In this sonnet, the poet runs through a catalogue of the senses, to see what it is that attracts him to his mistress. In fact he finds nothing, and therefore concludes that it must be some perverseness in his heart that forces him to love her and to be her slave. His reward is that she gives him penances for the sin he is committing in loving her. *****
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