This Texas

It’s quite a place, this Texas
Its hills, its prairies, its mountains high
Its valleys lush, its rivers and streams
That sparkle in the light

Its bois d’arc, hickory and red oaks all
And the cedars in the west stand tall
But the pine trees of East Texas
Stand tallest of them all

Sunrise over Lake Rayburn
Is a pleasant sight to see
While a beaver works his tedious task
A golden hawk soars high and free

From Longview, Lufkin, Lubbock and Wells
To Dallas, Houston and Spring
From north to south
East and west
Its praises Texans sing

One seems to stand a little taller
Heart near bursting with pride
While standing on Galveston’s great seawall
Just watching the changing tide

The lone star shines its brilliant light
From the desert to the sea
It’s quite a place, This Texas
Quite a place indeed

by Tom Pilkington

Other poems of PILKINGTON (2)

Comments (4)

This sonnet is a continuation of the previous one, and reflects on the situation that the poet and his friend find themselves in due to the entanglement with the dark lover, who it appears has infatuated both of them. A noticeable feature of the sonnet is the plethora of legal and financial metaphors, which combine to suggest that love is a mercenary and sordid transaction which binds the participants into an inescapable slavery. There is nothing in it which indicates that love can be at times an inspiring and magical experience, nothing of the devotion and eternal commitment which characterises so many of the earlier love sonnets to the youth. Instead one is given the impression of souls in torment, thrashing around in a sulphurous pit, and every hope that is raised is immediately dashed. He forfeits himself to free the youth, but she will not free him. The youth pays the whole debt to free the poet, yet he is still not freed. They are both trapped in the nasty murky world of the back street money lender, forever locked in a sordid enmeshment of sexual and emotional blackmail.
The imagery of money lending does not entirely hang together, in that it is almost impossible to be specific about the meanings of mortgage, bond, surety, sue, debtor in the context of loving relationships. However it hardly matters, for the picture of infatuation, addiction, hope, frenzy and disappointment is clear enough and no further embellishment seems to be necessary. It would be pleasant to set this down as a love poem, but it is more the poem of a tortured soul, and it is worth noting how far Shakespeare has wrested the tradition of the love sonnet from its sweet ideal of courtly and refined love to show how at times the actuality is rather more fleshly and distinctly of a darker and more savage colour. shakespeares-sonnets.com
Awesome I like this poem, check mine out
Awesome I like this poem, check mine out