Sonnet X: Daughter To That Good Earl

Poem By John Milton

To the Lady Margaret Ley

Daughter to that good Earl, once President
Of England's Council, and her Treasury,
Who lived in both, unstained with gold or fee,
And left them both, more in himself content,
Till sad the breaking of that Parliament
Broke him, as that dishonest victory
At Chaeronea, fatal to liberty,
Killed with report that old man eloquent.
Though later born than to have known the days
Wherein your father flourished, yet by you,
Madam, methinks I see him living yet;
So well your words his noble virtues praise,
That all both judge you to relate them true,
And to possess them, honoured Margaret.

Comments about Sonnet X: Daughter To That Good Earl

in my opinion this poem was about a girl of a former president of englands council who lived a normal life she didn't consider herself wealthy or a person who lived in poverty but lived a very low profiled life untill her father public speech left his country feeling as if he was dishonest and unfairly won a war by being persuasive leading his people to believe that he grew well and took ownership to his virtues


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