Disco Tree

Disco tree in the night sky
Won't you dance
Dance for me

Shake your leaves
Like a wild child
Wave them here
Sway them for me

Disco tree

by Adeline A Roberts

Other poems of ROBERTS (14)

Comments (4)

Sonnet 18 is the best known and most well-loved of all 154 sonnets. It is also one of the most straightforward in language and intent. The stability of love and its power to immortalize the subject of the poet's verse is the theme.
The poet starts the praise of his dear friend without ostentation, but he slowly builds the image of his friend into that of a perfect being. His friend is first compared to summer in the octave, but, at the start of the third quatrain, he is summer, and thus, he has metamorphosed into the standard by which true beauty can and should be judged. The poet's only answer to such profound joy and beauty is to ensure that his friend be forever in human memory, saved from the oblivion that accompanies death. He achieves this through his verse, believing that, as history writes itself, his friend will become one with time. The final couplet reaffirms the poet's hope that as long as there is breath in mankind, his poetry too will live on, and ensure the immortality of his muse. [Shakespeare, William. Sonnet 18. Ed. Amanda Mabillard. Shakespeare Online.12 Nov.2008]
It is almost universally accepted by scholars that the poet's love interest is a young man in sonnets 1-126. Sonnets 18-25 are often discussed as a group, as they all focus on the poet's affection for his friend.
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