The Flowers

When Love arose in heart and deed
To wake the world to greater joy,
'What can she give me now?' said Greed,
Who thought to win some costly toy.

He rose, he ran, he stoop'd, he clutch'd;
And soon the Flowers, that Love let fall,
In Greed's hot grasp were fray'd and smutch'd,
And Greed said, 'Flowers! Can this be all?'

He flung them down and went his way,
He cared no jot for thyme or rose;
But boys and girls came out to play,
And some took these and some took those—

Red, blue, and white, and green and gold;
And at their touch the dew return'd,
And all the bloom a thousandfold—
So red, so ripe, the roses burn'd!

by William Brighty Rands

Comments (3)

Wonderful poetry about human greed that can't see beauty in things. Liked it.
A flower can offer us many things apart from freshness and fragrance, the joy, the happiness and a priceless feeling which no other material things can provide. A wonderful poem indeed.
The greed of a man would desire costly things worth its value in money. But the worth of priceless flowers cannot be compared. Those who express their lovely sentiments through flowers know its worth. The poet has rightly pointed out: Red, blue, and white, and green and gold; And at their touch the dew return'd,