The Jew

Poem By Isaac Rosenberg

Moses, from whose loins I sprung,
Lit by a lamp in his blood
Ten immutable rules, a moon
For mutable lampless men.

The blonde, the bronze, the ruddy,
With the same heaving blood,
Keep tide to the moon of Moses.
Then why do they sneer at me?

Comments about The Jew

This is a powerful poem and asks a very poignant question indeed. Moses was a Jew and was inspired to pen the Ten Commandments that all the Christian Europeans at the time sought to follow yet they would sneer at a Jewish person like Rosenberg. Why indeed.


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