The Wayfarer

Poem By Patrick Henry Pearse

The beauty of the world hath made me sad,
This beauty that will pass;
Sometimes my heart hath shaken with great joy
To see a leaping squirrel in a tree,
Or a red lady-bird upon a stalk,
Or little rabbits in a field at evening,
Lit by a slanting sun,
Or some green hill where shadows drifted by
Some quiet hill where mountainy man hath sown
And soon would reap; near to the gate of Heaven;
Or children with bare feet upon the sands
Of some ebbed sea, or playing on the streets
Of little towns in Connacht,
Things young and happy.
And then my heart hath told me:
These will pass,
Will pass and change, will die and be no more,
Things bright and green, things young and happy;
And I have gone upon my way
Sorrowful.

Comments about The Wayfarer

BEAUTIFUL
One of my favourite poems. When I learned it at school it made me cry and I'm now eighty one and when I read it today I cried.
good very f6f6uvvtyubuyonpompiomomo
One of my favourite poems!


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Sine mé ná an Chailleach Bhéarra.

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lt has snatched my love and left me desolate,
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A fool that hath loved his folly,
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Or their fame in men's mouths;