The World Is Too Much With Us; Late And Soon

The world is too much with us; late and soon,
Getting and spending, we lay waste our powers:
Little we see in Nature that is ours;
We have given our hearts away, a sordid boon!
This Sea that bares her bosom to the moon;
The winds that will be howling at all hours,
And are up-gathered now like sleeping flowers;
For this, for everything, we are out of tune,
It moves us not.--Great God! I'd rather be
A Pagan suckled in a creed outworn;
So might I, standing on this pleasant lea,
Have glimpses that would make me less forlorn;
Have sight of Proteus rising from the sea;
Or hear old Triton blow his wreathed horn.

by William Wordsworth

Comments (15)

The poem opens with a complaint, saying that the world is out of whack and that people are destroying themselves with consumerism (getting and spending) . The world is too much with us sounds odd, and could mean several things. It could mean that the world life in the city, contemporary society – is just too much, as in This is too much for me, and I can't take it anymore. The world might refer to the natural world instead of the city, in which case it would mean that humanity i
this is a very good poem
Not less Wordsworthy. I remember reading and reciting this particular piece back during high-school days. William Wordsworth is, no doubts, one of my earliest literary instructors. Grand piece there.
The world is too much with us; late and soon, Getting and spending, we lay waste our powers: Little we see in Nature that is ours; very excellent, romantic, classic & modern as well
This is one of my favourite Wordsworth poems. It is simply divine. To me, it laments the passing of youth, when we were more in tune with the natural world. We lose that ability as we grow older and immerse ourselves in the machinations of the man-made world: We have given our hearts away, a sordid boon! . The poet notices how unmoved we've become by this natural splendour and instead tries to recapture that connection through some spectacular vivid Pagan imagery.
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