DTM (March 9,1957 / New York City)

Flower Scattering Face

TREMOR IN THE OCEAN OF LOVE WAVES CALAMITY
QOONIA[NATIVE LAND OF MAULANA RUMI] DROWNED IN THE HEART OF TABEZ'S[NATIVE LAND OF HIS SPIRITUAL IDEAL SHAMS TABREZ]BEAUTY
O! PREACHER THOU ART DEVOID OF SENSE OF JOYS CLEAR
THY ABSTENTION FROM SPRING OF WINE, IGNORANCE SHEER
I SEE EMERGES DISASTROUS DOOMSDAY WHENCE
THY RED LIPS CREATE PANIC, ARE ACTIVE HENCE
AROUND ME THERE IS A SHOW OF FLOURISH OF THY GRACE
DECORATES THE ENVIRONS OF MY HEART FLOWER SCATTERING FACE
HERE I REJOICE PROGRESS OF MY INTOXICATION
O! THY TIPSY EYES MOUNTED MY EXHILARATION

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Comments (3)

I had to return, to read this one once more. Like the words from Updike himself, this poem has a nearly sensual power in the way it can turn a human heart to look upon itself anew. I do like this poem so very much.
I may be one of the few people who like Updike's poetry even better than his fiction - though I am immensely grateful for both. What I like so much about this tribute is that I think Updike himself would like it, too. Indeed, it sounds just a bit like Updike himself. This whole poem captures the seriousness of Updike's recurring themes, always with just a slight hint of lightness: the setting in March, the memory of Patti Smith, the heat registers like the sound of the wind. But especially the lines - We believe what we / Cannot understand... - recall both the tentativeness and the absoluteness of Updike's vision. Perhaps my favorite of all Updike's poems, Seven Stanzas for Easter, seems right this Easter as it always does. I'm pleased I found this poem of Moran's on Easter Sunday. Thank you, thank you. I would have to say that He was not so much unlike Any of us, we who have been Fated to finally become The likeness of one another.
There is a beautiful depth of pathos in these words; a treat to read.