To Failure

You do not come dramatically, with dragons
That rear up with my life between their paws
And dash me butchered down beside the wagons,
The horses panicking; nor as a clause
Clearly set out to warn what can be lost,
What out-of-pocket charges must be borne
Expenses met; nor as a draughty ghost
That's seen, some mornings, running down a lawn.

It is these sunless afternoons, I find
Install you at my elbow like a bore
The chestnut trees are caked with silence. I'm
Aware the days pass quicker than before,
Smell staler too. And once they fall behind
They look like ruin. You have been here some time.

by Philip Larkin

Other poems of LARKIN (93)

Comments (2)

the best thing about larkin is to portray the exact feelings of the reader. the apt visual imagery adds to the beauty of this short poem.
This is a good companion to the novel Ethan Frome.