(1948 / Manchester, England.)

Welcome Home Soldier

Brave Soldier wounded in Iraq,
Lost his Mate in the same attack.
Sent back home to the NHS;
Military Hospitals all closed now.

Welcome home, go to A&E,
Be patience Dear just join the queue.
Go over there to the waiting room,
Wait with the Drunks and the Addicts to.

No Uniform please in case it offends?
Welcome home my Soldier friend.

Lost a limb an Arm or a Leg,
Got badly Burned or Shot in the Head.
You‘ll get your Op be patient Dear,
Your back home now, so wait your turn.

Anyone check you for PTS,
Or Council about your friend’s sudden death.
Not British old boy, don’t be so silly,
Stiff upper lip, pull your self together.

Torn apart from your Comrades, ones you relied on,
The only ones who could understand.
Those who shared all the Trauma and Hardships,
The Dangers the Blood and the Fear.

Invalided out of the Army and back home now,
How lonely you feel with no one to share.
With no one to listen and no one to care,
About all of the things you saw while out there.

Got an appointment to see the Queen,
At Buckingham Palace no less.
In London today and feeling so proud,
Collecting his Medal for Bravery.

With Oxford Street close at hand,
He decides to visit the Shops.
Gets told to leave at one Famous Store,
“In case Uniform offends.”

For Queen and Country and a grateful Nation,
The Recruitment Sergeant said.
It’s nice to be back home again,
Where the Uniform offends.

Just home from War,
Broken, bruised, battered and scarred by horrors he has seen,
Now he’s back home and the Uniform offends? ? ? ?
Now that’s offensive to me.

Don’t agree with the War, that’s a point of view,
If you’re in the Armed Forces you go were you’re told.
Those who have Served deserve better than this,
Respect and care at the very least.

Welcome home Soldier from a Grateful Nation.

User Rating: 5,0 / 5 ( 6 votes ) 8

Comments (8)

Realistic poetry. The young pay for the sins of the rich man. A powerful and worthwhile poem.
Another difficult subject, handled ably and tenderly. 'Don't you know me I'm the boy next door The one that was so easy to ignore is that what I was fighting for? ' -Huey Lewis, 'Walking on a Thin Line'
I very much enjoyed this poem. It expresses the sentiments so many of us hold. Our soldiers give up so much to serve and protect us, follow orders, and the vast, vast majority are good, caring people trying to do a dangerous, difficult job well and with honor. Your poetry grapples this subject with grace and style.
Well written piece with a stong message.
David, thank you for speaking out. I never made it into the services, but I did at one time work for them. It was during the Falklands. I lost a few friends down there. It annoys me when people say the uniform offends. They should be proud of our service personal, whether it be on land, air or sea. They should be treated as heroes when they return. Those who bemoan should be sent down there and then lets see how their complaining would be. Maybe they could shout at the enemy with their big gobs. Act like the slobs they really are. The problem it takes courage, not words to fight someone. The yobs that speak out are little sheep when someone challenges them. Our service personal get more respect from me that the loud mouth twits will ever get from anyone. Marvelous Poem for the voices unheard. Worth more than the ten than I can only give. Thanks for sharing it my friend. David
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