What Cowboys Know About Love

Last night on the sports channel
I watched the rodeo.
Those cowboys have it right;
the best and the beauty of it.
You cannot win, so you ride
for as long as you can and enjoy it.
When you dismount,
whether it be on your own or not,
it won't look pretty. You'll limp off.
But you'll feel good; your heart
will be pounding like it never has,
and walking away, one crazy step
after another, your ears will ring
with the loud approval
of those who never felt so good.


Anonymous submission.

by Louis McKee

Comments (1)

McKee uses the simplest language to strike a chord. The metaphor carries the reader through the poem like the wild stallion carries the cowboy. Also, the brevity of the poem makes the ride all the more wonderful because it leaves the reader wanting more. However, having more would have ruined the ride somehow. McKee knows when to dismount. By the end of the poem the reader's 'heart will be pounding like it never has, ' even after a second or third read. Also, the reader will be 'walking away, one crazy step/ after another, your ears will ring with the loud approval/ of those who never felt so good.'