Wind

Poem By Ted Hughes

This house has been far out at sea all night,
The woods crashing through darkness, the booming hills,
Winds stampeding the fields under the window
Floundering black astride and blinding wet

Till day rose; then under an orange sky
The hills had new places, and wind wielded
Blade-light, luminous black and emerald,
Flexing like the lens of a mad eye.

At noon I scaled along the house-side as far as
The coal-house door. Once I looked up -
Through the brunt wind that dented the balls of my eyes
The tent of the hills drummed and strained its guyrope,

The fields quivering, the skyline a grimace,
At any second to bang and vanish with a flap;
The wind flung a magpie away and a black-
Back gull bent like an iron bar slowly. The house

Rang like some fine green goblet in the note
That any second would shatter it. Now deep
In chairs, in front of the great fire, we grip
Our hearts and cannot entertain book, thought,

Or each other. We watch the fire blazing,
And feel the roots of the house move, but sit on,
Seeing the window tremble to come in,
Hearing the stones cry out under the horizons.

Comments about Wind

It is open to any interpretation as is all poetry and that is the beauty of poetry! It allows us to experiment and adventure our own wandering conscience and find meaning that is obvious rather than obscure or hidden. It is enlightening through our own meditation.
Wind poems translation
Why is this poem obviously about an argument? There is not a strand of evidence to suggest the poem is about such. The poem is about the wind and the poet cares about nature and nature alone. Anyone who has felt the force of the wind high up on the Yorkshire moors will know that a recent domestic dispute would be the last thing on your mind. Hughes is interested in the wind as a force of nature. He explores its power and intensity in the poem. Should the poem involve him and his wife at all, it must be about how fragile and insignificant they are in the presence of such a powerful force.
What Ted Hughes Said 'For quite a few years my parents lived in a house on top of a high ridge in West Yorkshire, over the Calder Valley. Either side of this ridge the valleys just dived away out of sight, right down into a gorge and trees and streams... and then on the other side the hillsides rose up very steeply to the moors... 'This is a poem about a gale that went on for a few days and if you've ever been in a gale like that for a while, it gets in your head, begins to affect you.' Taken from Channel 4 learning website.
This poem is obviously about an argument between Hughes and his wife. I understand how people could think it was about a storm. But if you analyze the poem you would see that Ted is comparing the argument to a storm. The first line of the first stanza 'this house has been far out at sea all night' is a metaphor. This metaphor is saying that the house is a boat in a huge stormy sea. Being 'far out at sea' indicates that they cannot stabalize themselves and make it back to safety. In other words, the argument is so out of control that it is too late for them now to turn back around and save themselves from this horrific experience. This whole poem is an extended metaphor, the reason for this is so Hughes can explain the poem and himself without putting it out there in front of your eyes. What fun is a poem that doesn't have to be analyzed and understood? Ted is basically saying that his relationship with Sylvia is one gigantic, out of control argument - It is just like a storm or hurricane, excedingly violent and very destructive. I hope I've helped someone out with their school work or just someone wanting to know what this poem is about. =)


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