Queen Elizabeth I Quotes

Much suspected of me, Nothing proved can be, Quoth Elizabeth, prisoner.
Elizabeth I (1533-1603), Queen of England (1558-1603). As quoted in The Sayings of Queen Elizabeth, ch. 1, by Frederick Chamberlin (1923). Written with a diamond on a glass window in 1554, when she was still Princess Elizabeth, during her unjust imprisonment for treason.
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... what a family is without a steward, a ship without a pilot, a flock without a shepherd, a body without a head, the same, I think, is a kingdom without the health and safety of a good monarch.
Elizabeth I (1533-1603), Queen of England (1558-1603). As quoted in The Sayings of Queen Elizabeth, ch. 1, by Frederick Chamberlin (1923). Written c. 1550 to her half-brother, the "boy king" Edward VI (1537-1553).
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I think he and I should get married!
Elizabeth I (1533-1603), British monarch, Queen of England (1558-1603). As quoted in The Sayings of Queen Elizabeth, ch. 6, by Frederick Chamberlin (1923). Said to de Silva, the Spanish Ambassador, when he told her that the Pope had a high opinion of her ability. Elizabeth was a Protestant, which had led to great political strife with those who wished to have a Roman Catholic monarch. Sought after by many noblemen, and urged by her countrymen to marry, Elizabeth steadfastly refused.
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There is a close tie of affection between sovereigns and their subjects; and as chaste wives should have no eyes but for their husbands, so faithful liegemen should keep their regards at home and not look after foreign crowns. For my part I like not for my sheep to wear a stranger's mark nor to dance after a foreigner's whistle.
Elizabeth I (1533-1603), Queen of England (1558-1603). As quoted in The Sayings of Queen Elizabeth, ch. 13, by Frederick Chamberlin (1923). "To an official, who had asked her opinion of the right of Sir Thomas Arundel to precedence in England because of a foreign honour which he had received."
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... [ellipsis in source] it is true that the world was made in six days, but it was by God, to whose power the infirmity of men is not to be compared.
Elizabeth I (1533-1603), British monarch, Queen of England (1558-1603). As quoted in The Sayings of Queen Elizabeth, ch. 23, by Frederick Chamberlin (1923). Said in 1565 to de Foix, the French Ambassador, who complained that he had waited six days without getting an answer to his proposition that she marry a French prince.
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I, a virgin, can make my frank boast that I communicate to no mortal man my secret counsels except to such as I have chosen on account of their taciturnity; then, if these secrets are later discovered, I know whom to accuse.
Elizabeth I (1533-1603), British monarch, Queen of England (1558-1603). As quoted in The Sayings of Queen Elizabeth, ch. 11, by Frederick Chamberlin (1923). Said in 1561 to the Swedish Ambassador. Elizabeth remained single all her life.
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To be a king and wear a crown is more glorious to them that see it than it is pleasure to them that bear it.
Elizabeth I (1533-1603), Queen of England (1558-1603). As quoted in The Sayings of Queen Elizabeth, ch. 6, by Frederick Chamberlin (1923). Said to the House of Commons when she disbanded Parliament in 1601 for the last time in her life.
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Must! Is must a word to be addressed to princes? Little man, little man! thy father, if he had been alive, durst not have used that word.
Elizabeth I (1533-1603), British Queen of England. Attributed (March 1603). Remonstrance to Sir Robert Cecil, who had urged her to go to bed in her last illness. Both Robert and his father, William Cecil (Lord Burghley), were secretaries of state to Elizabeth.
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Must! Is must a word to be addressed to princes? Little man, little man! thy father, if he had been alive, durst not have used that word.
Elizabeth I (1533-1603), British Queen of England. Quoted in A Short History of the English People, ch. 7, J.R. Green (1874). Attributed remonstrance to Sir Robert Cecil, who had urged her to go to bed in her last illness, March 1603; both Robert and his father William Cecil (Lord Burghley) were secretaries of state to Elizabeth.
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I know that I have the body of a weak and feeble woman, but I have the heart and stomach of a king, and of a king of England too.
Elizabeth I (1533-1603), British Queen of England. speech, Aug. 8, 1588, at Tilbury, England. Quoted in The Tudors, ch. 7, Christopher Morris (1955). Address to troops on the approach of the Spanish Armada.
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