Queen Elizabeth I Quotes

Madame d'Estampes and Madame de Valentinois make me fear that I should be only honoured by my husband as a queen and not loved by him as a woman.
Elizabeth I (1533-1603), British monarch, Queen of England (1558-1603). As quoted in The Sayings of Queen Elizabeth, ch. 7, by Frederick Chamberlin (1923). Said c. 1564 to Fenelon, the French Ambassador, who urged her to marry into the French royalty. D'Estampes and de Valentinois were well known to be illicit mistresses of members of the French royal family.
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Mortua—sed non sepulta! Mortua—sed non sepulta! [Dead—but not buried! Dead—but not buried!]
Elizabeth I (1533-1603), Queen of England (1558-1603). As quoted in The Sayings of Queen Elizabeth, ch. 3, by Frederick Chamberlin (1923). Said in 1599, upon learning of rumors that she had died. She would repeat this often until her actual death.
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Be of good cheer, for you will never want, for the bullet was meant for me, though it hit you.
Elizabeth I (1533-1603), Queen of England (1558-1603). As quoted in The Sayings of Queen Elizabeth, ch. 13, by Frederick Chamberlin (1923). "To one of her boatmen who was shot when within six feet of her on her barge in the Thames. She took off her scarf and gave it to him to bind over his wound, which was bleeding profusely."
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If we still advise we shall never do.
Elizabeth I (1533-1603), Queen of England (1558-1603). As quoted in The Sayings of Queen Elizabeth, ch. 11, by Frederick Chamberlin (1923). To Sir Henry Sidney, governor of Ireland.
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Though the sex to which I belong is considered weak ... you will nevertheless find me a rock that bends to no wind.
Elizabeth I (1533-1603), British monarch, Queen of England (1558-1603). As quoted in The Sayings of Queen Elizabeth, ch. 11, by Frederick Chamberlin (1923). To the French Ambassador.
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Those who appear the most sanctified are the worst.
Elizabeth I (1533-1603), Queen of England (1558-1603). As quoted in The Sayings of Queen Elizabeth, ch. 11, by Frederick Chamberlin (1923). Said to the Spanish Ambassador when he protested her arrest of Catholics. (Elizabeth, a Protestant, was embattled against Roman Catholics throughout her reign.).
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I do not want a husband who honours me as a queen, if he does not love me as a woman.
Elizabeth I (1533-1603), British monarch, Queen of England (1558-1603). As quoted in The Sayings of Queen Elizabeth, ch. 7, by Frederick Chamberlin (1923). Said to Fenelon, the French Ambassador, who urged her to marry into the French royalty. Elizabeth remained single and died leaving no heir.
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A strength to harm is perilous in the hand of an ambitious head.
Elizabeth I (1533-1603), Queen of England (1558-1603). As quoted in The Sayings of Queen Elizabeth, ch. 13, by Frederick Chamberlin (1923). To Sir Henry Sidney, governor of Ireland.
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It is a natural virtue incident to our sex to be pitiful of those that are afflicted.
Elizabeth I (1533-1603), British monarch, Queen of England (1558-1603). As quoted in The Sayings of Queen Elizabeth, ch. 11, by Frederick Chamberlin (1923). "To Doctor Dale, to say to the Queen-Mother of France, Catherine de' Medici, in behalf of a woman in exile for her religion." Elizabeth was a Protestant; France was a Roman Catholic country.
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Although my royal rank causes me to doubt whether my kingdom is not more sought after than myself, yet I understand that you have found other graces in me.
Elizabeth I (1533-1603), British monarch, Queen of England (1558-1603). As quoted in The Sayings of Queen Elizabeth, ch. 8, by Frederick Chamberlin (1923). Said c. 1572 to Francis, duke of Alencon and Anjou (1554-1584) in France, whom she was being urged to marry.
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