Queen Elizabeth I Quotes

The past cannot be cured.
Elizabeth I (1533-1603), British monarch, Queen of England (1558-1603). As quoted in The Sayings of Queen Elizabeth, ch. 11, by Frederick Chamberlin (1923). To the Spanish Ambassador.
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If there were two princes in Christendom who had good will and courage, it would be very easy to reconcile the religious difficulties; there is only one Jesus Christ and one faith, and all the rest is a dispute over trifles.
Elizabeth I (1533-1603), Queen of England (1558-1603). As quoted in The Sayings of Queen Elizabeth, ch. 10, by Frederick Chamberlin (1923). Referring to the ongoing arguments between Protestants (of which Elizabeth was one) and Roman Catholics in England and other parts of Europe. She said this to the French Ambassador, whose country was Catholic.
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He who placed me in this seat will keep me here.
Elizabeth I (1533-1603), British monarch, Queen of England (1558-1603). As quoted in The Sayings of Queen Elizabeth, ch. 9, by Frederick Chamberlin (1923). Said in 1601 when her erstwhile favorite, Robert Devereux, second Earl of Essex, instigated a revolt to unseat her.
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Have a care over my people. You have my people—do you that which I ought to do. They are my people.... See unto them—see unto them, for they are my charge.... I care not for myself; my life is not dear to me. My care is for my people. I pray God, whoever succeedeth me, be as careful of them as I am.
Elizabeth I (1533-1603), Queen of England (1558-1603). As quoted in The Sayings of Queen Elizabeth, ch. 2, by Frederick Chamberlin (1923). Said to her judges in 1559, as they took office.
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The word "must" is not to be used to princes.
Elizabeth I (1533-1603), British monarch, Queen of England (1558-1603). As quoted in The Sayings of Queen Elizabeth, ch. 24, by Frederick Chamberlin (1923).
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There is one thing higher than Royalty: and that is religion, which causes us to leave the world, and seek God.
Elizabeth I (1533-1603), British monarch, Queen of England (1558-1603). As quoted in The Sayings of Queen Elizabeth, ch. 9, by Frederick Chamberlin (1923). Said to one of her attendants; reported by Fenelon, the French ambassador.
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I find that I sent wolves not shepherds to govern Ireland, for they have left me nothing but ashes and carcasses to reign over!
Elizabeth I (1533-1603), British monarch, Queen of England (1558-1603). As quoted in The Sayings of Queen Elizabeth, ch. 23, by Frederick Chamberlin (1923). Said to her court after the brutal response of her troops to rebellion by the Irish.
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This day died a man with much wit and very little judgment.
Elizabeth I (1533-1603), British monarch, Queen of England (1558-1603). As quoted in The Sayings of Queen Elizabeth, ch. 1, by Frederick Chamberlin (1923). Said in 1549, when she was still Princess Elizabeth, on the execution day of Admiral Thomas Seymour (1508?-1549), who had been convicted of high treason. A schemer, he had had marital designs on Elizabeth and had been the cause of unfounded scandal that was very painful to her. Seymour—whose sister was the third wife of Elizabeth's father, King Henry VIII; whose twelve-year-old nephew was the current King, Edward VI; and whose brother was serving as protector of the realm—had married Henry's widow, Catherine, within a month of his death. The following year, Catherine died, and Seymour began the pursuit of Elizabeth that led to his execution.
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Kings were wont to honour philosophers; but if I had such I would honour them as angels that should have such purity in them that they would not seek when they are the second to be the first, and when they are third to be the second.
Elizabeth I (1533-1603), British monarch, Queen of England (1558-1603). As quoted in The Sayings of Queen Elizabeth, ch. 12, by Frederick Chamberlin (1923). To a committee of both Houses of Parliament, which had demanded that she marry and name a successor.
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The stone often recoils on the head of the thrower.
Elizabeth I (1533-1603), Queen of England (1558-1603). As quoted in The Sayings of Queen Elizabeth, ch. 18, by Frederick Chamberlin (1923). To Mary, Queen of Scots (1542-1587), who had been helping enemies of Elizabeth's. Elizabeth was a daughter of King Henry VIII; after Henry's offspring, Mary had the strongest claim to the throne and schemed to win it. Eventually, and with great sorrow, Elizabeth had Mary executed.
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