Queen Elizabeth I Quotes

I would gladly chastise those who represent things as different from what they are. Those who steal property or make counterfeit money are punished, and those ought to be still more severely dealt with who steal away or falsify the good name of a prince.
Elizabeth I (1533-1603), Queen of England (1558-1603). As quoted in The Sayings of Queen Elizabeth, ch. 13, by Frederick Chamberlin (1923). To Fenelon, the French Ambassador.
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Let the good service of well-deservers be never rewarded with loss. Let their thanks be such as may encourage more strivers for the like.
Elizabeth I (1533-1603), Queen of England (1558-1603). As quoted in The Sayings of Queen Elizabeth, ch. 11, by Frederick Chamberlin (1923). To Sir Henry Sidney, governor of Ireland.
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Was I not born in this Realm? Were my parents born in any foreign country?... Is not my Kingdom here? Whom have I oppressed? Whom have I enriched to other's harm? What turmoil have I made to this Commonwealth that I should be suspected to have no regard of the same?
Elizabeth I (1533-1603), British monarch, Queen of England (1558-1603). As quoted in The Sayings of Queen Elizabeth, ch. 12, by Frederick Chamberlin (1923). To a committee of both Houses of Parliament, which had demanded that she marry and name a successor. She was defending herself against the implication that she was not sufficiently devoted to England and to her responsibilities as Queen. Elizabeth's parents were King Henry VIII and his second wife, Anne Boleyn.
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Though I am not imperial, and though Elizabeth may not deserve it, the Queen of England will easily deserve to have an emperor's son to marry.
Elizabeth I (1533-1603), British monarch, Queen of England (1558-1603). As quoted in The Sayings of Queen Elizabeth, ch. 7, by Frederick Chamberlin (1923). Said in 1564 to the Ambassador of the Duke of Wurtemberg. Elizabeth never married and died leaving no heir.
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The end crowneth the work.
Elizabeth I (1533-1603), British monarch, Queen of England (1558-1603). As quoted in The Sayings of Queen Elizabeth, ch. 11, by Frederick Chamberlin (1923).
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It seems incredible, and I love them no less; and I can say that I would rather die than see any diminution of it on one side or the other.
Elizabeth I (1533-1603), British monarch, Queen of England (1558-1603). As quoted in The Sayings of Queen Elizabeth, ch. 2, by Frederick Chamberlin (1923). Said to the French ambassador in the latter 1500s about her subjects' devotion to her.
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I regret the unhappiness of princes who are slaves to forms and fettered by caution.
Elizabeth I (1533-1603), British monarch, Queen of England (1558-1603). As quoted in The Sayings of Queen Elizabeth, ch. 23, by Frederick Chamberlin (1923). Said in 1601 to King Henry IV of France.
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I know I have the body of a weak, feeble woman; but I have the heart and stomach of a king—and of a King of England too, and think foul scorn that Parma or Spain, or any prince of Europe, should dare to invade the borders of my realm; to which, rather than any dishonour should grow by me, I myself will take up arms—I myself will be your general, judge, and rewarder of every one of your virtues in the field.
Elizabeth I (1533-1603), Queen of England (1558-1603). As quoted in The Sayings of Queen Elizabeth, ch. 2, by Frederick Chamberlin (1923). In a stirring speech to England's troops in 1588 on the hill at Tilbury; it was they who would have to defend her reign against the Armada, the fleet which had been sent by Philip II of Spain, a Roman Catholic, to overthrow Elizabeth, who was a Protestant, and take her throne. The English defeated the Armada.
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I do not so much rejoice that God hath made me to be a Queen, as to be a Queen over so thankful a people.
Elizabeth I (1533-1603), British monarch, Queen of England (1558-1603). As quoted in The Sayings of Queen Elizabeth, ch. 6, by Frederick Chamberlin (1923). Said to the House of Commons when she disbanded Parliament in 1601 for the last time in her life.
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Where minds differ and opinions swerve there is scant a friend in that company.
Elizabeth I (1533-1603), British monarch, Queen of England (1558-1603). As quoted in The Sayings of Queen Elizabeth, ch. 11, by Frederick Chamberlin (1923).
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