Ralph Waldo Emerson Quotes

For the most part, only the light characters travel. Who are you that have no task to keep you at home?
Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Culture," The Conduct of Life (1860).
Nothing great was ever achieved without enthusiasm.
Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. Essays, "Circles," First Series (1841).
Sorrow makes us all children again, destroys all differences of intellect. The wisest knows nothing.
Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. Journals, vol. 8, entry for Jan. 30, 1842 (1909-1914).
Let the amelioration in our laws of property proceed from the concession of the rich, not from the grasping of the poor. Let us understand that the equitable rule is, that no one should take more than his share, let him be ever so rich.
Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. Speech, January 25, 1841, before the Mechanics' Apprentices' Library Association, Boston, Massachusetts. "Man the Reformer," Nature, Addresses, and Lectures (1849).
A philosopher must be more than a philosopher.
Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Plato; or, the Philosopher," Representative Men (1850).
Great country, diminutive minds. America is formless, has no terrible and no beautiful condensation.
Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. Journal entry, June 1847. Quoted in Harold Bloom, The American Religion (1992).
Heaven is large, and affords space for all modes of love and fortitude. Why should we be busybodies and superserviceable?
Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Spiritual Laws," Essays, First Series (1841, repr. 1847).
A strong person makes the law and custom null before his own will.
Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. Speech, December 9, 1841, at the Masonic Temple, Boston, Massachusetts. "The Conservative," Nature, Addresses, and Lectures (1849).
Thoughts come into our minds by avenues which we never left open, and thoughts go out of our minds through avenues which we never voluntarily opened.
Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "The Over-Soul," Essays, First Series (1841, repr. 1847).
The subject is said to have the property of making dull men eloquent.
Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Address Delivered in Concord on the Anniversary of the Emancipation of the Negroes in the British West Indies, August 1, 1844," Miscellanies (1883, repr. 1903).