Ralph Waldo Emerson Quotes

Manners require time, as nothing is more vulgar than haste.
Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Behavior," The Conduct of Life (1860).
Our moods do not believe in each other.
Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Circles," Essays, First Series (1841, repr. 1847).
A mob is a society of bodies voluntarily bereaving themselves of reason, and traversing its work. The mob is man voluntarily descending to the nature of the beast.
Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Compensation," Essays, First Series (1841, repr. 1847).
I grieve that grief can teach me nothing, nor carry me one step into real nature.
Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Experience," Essays, Second Series (1844).
You shall not come nearer a man by getting into his house.
Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Friendship," Essays, First Series (1841, repr. 1847).
Our admiration of the antique is not admiration of the old, but of the natural.
Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "History," Essays, First Series (1841, repr. 1847).
A sect or a party is an elegant incognito, devised to save a man from the vexation of thinking.
Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. Journal entry, June 20, 1831. Journals (1909-1914).
Why needs a man be rich? Why must he have horses, fine garments, handsome apartments, access to public houses, and places of amusement? Only for want of thought.
Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. Speech, January 25, 1841, before the Mechanics' Apprentices' Library Association, Boston, Massachusetts. "Man the Reformer," Nature, Addresses, and Lectures (1849).
Society gains nothing whilst a man, not himself renovated, attempts to renovate things around him; he has become tediously good in some particular but negligent or narrow in the rest; and hypocrisy and vanity are often the disgusting result.
Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. Lecture, March 3, 1884, in Amory Hall, Boston, Massachusetts. "New England Reformers," Essays, Second Series (1844).
Here among the mountains the pinions of thought should be strong, and one should see the errors of men from a calmer height of love and wisdom.
Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. Journal entry, 1832. quoted in notes to "The Lord's Supper," Miscellanies (1883, repr. 1903). Written in the White Mountains of New Hampshire as Emerson contemplated leaving the ministry.