Richard Lovelace Quotes

Then Love, I beg, when next thou takest thy bow, Thy angry shafts, and dost heart-chasing go, Pass rascal deer, strike me the largest doe.
Richard Lovelace (1618-1658), British poet. La Bella Bona Roba (l. 13-15). . . Oxford Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. Frank Kermode and John Hollander, general eds. (1973) Oxford University Press (Also published as six paperback vols.: Medieval English Literature, J. B. Trapp, ed.; The Literature of Renaissance England, John Hollander and Frank Kermode, eds.; The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Martin Price, ed.; Romantic Poetry and Prose, Harold Bloom and Lionel Trilling, eds.; Victorian Prose and Poetry, Lionel Trilling and Harold Bloom, eds.; Modern British Literature, Frank Kermode and John Hollander, eds.).
(62) (26)
Love, then unstinted, Love did sip, And cherries plucked fresh from the lip; On cheeks and roses free he fed; Lasses like autumn plums did drop, And lads indifferently did crop A flower and a maidenhead.
Richard Lovelace (1618-1658), British poet. Love Made in the First Age: To Chloris (l. 13-18). . . Oxford Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. Frank Kermode and John Hollander, general eds. (1973) Oxford University Press (Also published as six paperback vols.: Medieval English Literature, J. B. Trapp, ed.; The Literature of Renaissance England, John Hollander and Frank Kermode, eds.; The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Martin Price, ed.; Romantic Poetry and Prose, Harold Bloom and Lionel Trilling, eds.; Victorian Prose and Poetry, Lionel Trilling and Harold Bloom, eds.; Modern British Literature, Frank Kermode and John Hollander, eds.).
(51) (21)
Poor verdant fool, and now green ice! thy joys, Large and as lasting as thy perch of grass, Bid us lay in 'gainst winter rain, and poise Their floods with an o'erflowing glass.
Richard Lovelace (1618-1658), British poet. The Grasshopper (l. 17-20). . . Norton Anthology of Poetry, The. Alexander W. Allison and others, eds. (3d ed., 1983) W. W. Norton & Company.
(26) (32)
Then, if when I have lov'd my round, Thou prov'st the pleasant she, With spoils of meaner beauties crown'd I laden will return to thee, Ev'n sated with variety.
Richard Lovelace (1618-1658), British poet. The Scrutiny (l. 16-20). . . Norton Anthology of Poetry, The. Alexander W. Allison and others, eds. (3d ed., 1983) W. W. Norton & Company.
(31) (24)
Stone walls do not a prison make, Nor iron bars a cage; Minds innocent and quiet take That for an hermitage; If I have freedom in my love And in my soul am free, Angels alone, that soar above, Enjoy such liberty.
Richard Lovelace (1618-1658), British poet. To Althea, from Prison (l. 25-32). . . Oxford Book of English Verse, The, 1250-1918. Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch, ed. (New ed., rev. and enl., 1939) Oxford University Press.
(34) (2)
Here we'll strip and cool our fire In cream below, in milk-baths higher; And when all wells are drawn dry, I'll drink a tear out of thine eye.
Richard Lovelace (1618-1658), British poet. To Amarantha, That She Would Dishevel Her Hair (l. 21-24). . . Oxford Book of English Verse, The, 1250-1918. Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch, ed. (New ed., rev. and enl., 1939) Oxford University Press.
(7) (1)
Though seas and land be 'twixt us both, Our faith and troth, Like separated souls, All time and space controls: Above the highest sphere we meet Unseen, unknown, and greet as angels greet.
Richard Lovelace (1618-1658), British poet. To Lucasta, Going beyond the Seas (l. 13-18). . . Oxford Book of English Verse, The, 1250-1918. Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch, ed. (New ed., rev. and enl., 1939) Oxford University Press.
(11) (1)
Yet this inconstancy is such As you too shall adore; I could not love thee, dear, so much, Loved I not honor more.
Richard Lovelace (1618-1658), British poet. To Lucasta, Going to the Wars (l. 9-12). . . Oxford Book of English Verse, The, 1250-1918. Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch, ed. (New ed., rev. and enl., 1939) Oxford University Press.
(19) (2)