Richard Wilbur Quotes

As near and far as grass, Where eyes become the sunlight, and the hand Is worthy of water: the dreamt land Toward which all hungers leap, all pleasures pass.
Richard Wilbur (b. 1921), U.S. poet. A Baroque Wall-Fountain in the Villa Sciarra (l. 56-60). . . Norton Anthology of Poetry, The. Alexander W. Allison and others, eds. (3d ed., 1983) W. W. Norton & Company.
(37) (7)
—the main jet Struggling aloft unti it seems at rest In the act of rising, until The very wish of water is reversed,
Richard Wilbur (b. 1921), U.S. poet. A Baroque Wall-Fountain in the Villa Sciarra (l. 31-34). . . Norton Anthology of Poetry, The. Alexander W. Allison and others, eds. (3d ed., 1983) W. W. Norton & Company.
(25) (6)
A barn shall harbour heaven, A stall become a shrine.
Richard Wilbur (b. 1921), U.S. poet. A Christmas Hymn (l. 7-8). . . Oxford Book of Christmas Poems, The. Michael Harrison and Christopher Stuart-Clark, eds. (1983) Oxford University Press.
(24) (7)
And every stone shall cry, In praises of the child By whose descent among us The worlds are reconciled.
Richard Wilbur (b. 1921), U.S. poet. A Christmas Hymn (l. 29-32). . . Oxford Book of Christmas Poems, The. Michael Harrison and Christopher Stuart-Clark, eds. (1983) Oxford University Press.
(23) (6)
Ask us, ask us whether with the worldless rose Our hearts shall fail us; come demanding Whether there shall be lofty or long standing When the bronze annals of the oak-tree close.
Richard Wilbur (b. 1921), U.S. poet. Advice to a Prophet (l. 33-36). . . Oxford Book of Contemporary Verse, The, 1945-1980. D. J. Enright, comp. (1980) Oxford University Press.
(7) (2)
What should we be without The dolphin's arc, the dove's return, These things in which we have seen ourselves and spoken?
Richard Wilbur (b. 1921), U.S. poet. Advice to a Prophet (l. 23-25). . . Oxford Book of Contemporary Verse, The, 1945-1980. D. J. Enright, comp. (1980) Oxford University Press.
(3) (2)
Nor shall you scare us with talk of the death of the race. How should we dream of this place without us?— The sun mere fire, the leaves untroubled about us, A stone look on the stone's face?
Richard Wilbur (b. 1921), U.S. poet. Advice to a Prophet (l. 9-12). . . Oxford Book of Contemporary Verse, The, 1945-1980. D. J. Enright, comp. (1980) Oxford University Press.
(5) (2)
Oh none too soon through the air white and dry Will the clear announcer's voice Beat like a dove, and you and I From the heart's anarch and responsible town Return by subway-mouth to life again, Bearing the morning papers,
Richard Wilbur (b. 1921), U.S. poet. After the Last Bulletins (l. 22-27). . . Modern American Poetry. Louis Untermeyer, ed. (8th rev. ed., 1962) Harcourt, Brace and Company.
(4) (2)
I am a sort of martyr, as you see, A horizontal monument to patience. The calves of waitresses parade about My helpless head upon this sodden floor. Well, I am down again, but not yet out. O sweet frustrations, I shall be back for more.
Richard Wilbur (b. 1921), U.S. poet. A Voice from under the Table (l. 43-48). . . New Oxford Book of American Verse, The. Richard Ellmann, ed. (1976) Oxford University Press.
(6) (1)
All true enough: and true as well that she Was beautiful, and danced, and is now dead.
Richard Wilbur (b. 1921), U.S. poet. A Voice from under the Table (l. 31-32). . . New Oxford Book of American Verse, The. Richard Ellmann, ed. (1976) Oxford University Press.
(6) (3)