Richard Wilbur Quotes

Haze, char, and the weather of All Souls: A giant absence mopes upon the trees:
Richard Wilbur (b. 1921), U.S. poet. In the Elegy Season (l. 1-2). . . New Poets of England and America. Donald Hall, Robert Pack, and Louis Simpson, eds. (1957) Meridian Books.
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If the juggler is tired now, if the broom stands In the dust again, if the table starts to drop Through the daily dark again, and though the plate Lies flat on the table top, For him we batter our hands Who has won for once over the world's weight.
Richard Wilbur (b. 1921), U.S. poet. Juggler (l. 25-30). . . New Yorker Book of Poems, The. (1969) The Viking Press. (Paperback edition of 1974 published by William Morrow & Company).
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the earth falls So in our hearts from brilliance, Settles and is forgot.
Richard Wilbur (b. 1921), U.S. poet. Juggler (l. 3-5). . . New Yorker Book of Poems, The. (1969) The Viking Press. (Paperback edition of 1974 published by William Morrow & Company).
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Haul them off! Hide them! The heart winces For junk and gimcrack, for jerrybuilt things And the men who make them for a little money,
Richard Wilbur (b. 1921), U.S. poet. Junk (l. 21-26). . . Norton Anthology of Poetry, The. Alexander W. Allison and others, eds. (3d ed., 1983) W. W. Norton & Company.
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Yet the things themselves in thoughtless honor Have kept composure,
Richard Wilbur (b. 1921), U.S. poet. Junk (l. 33-35). . . Norton Anthology of Poetry, The. Alexander W. Allison and others, eds. (3d ed., 1983) W. W. Norton & Company.
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Outside the open window The morning air is all awash with angels. Some are in bed-sheets, some are in blouses, Some are in smocks: but truly there they are.
Richard Wilbur (b. 1921), U.S. poet. Love Calls Us to the Things of This World (l. 5-8). . . Norton Anthology of Modern Poetry, The. Richard Ellmann and Robert O'Clair, eds. (2d ed., 1988) W. W. Norton & Company.
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The soul shrinks From all that it is about to remember, From the punctual rape of every blessed day, And cries, "Oh, let there be nothing on earth but laundry, Nothing but rosy hands in the rising steam And clear dances done in the sight of heaven."
Richard Wilbur (b. 1921), U.S. poet. Love Calls Us to the Things of This World (l. 17-22). . . Norton Anthology of Modern Poetry, The. Richard Ellmann and Robert O'Clair, eds. (2d ed., 1988) W. W. Norton & Company.
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To claim, at a dead party, to have spotted a grackle, When in fact you haven't of late, can do no harm.
Richard Wilbur (b. 1921), U.S. poet. Lying (l. 1-2). . . Harvard Book of Contemporary American Poetry, The. Helen Vendler, ed. (1985) The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press.
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Or of the garden where we first mislaid Simplicity of wish and will, forgetting Out of what cognate splendor all things came To take their scattering names;
Richard Wilbur (b. 1921), U.S. poet. Lying (l. 75-78). . . Harvard Book of Contemporary American Poetry, The. Helen Vendler, ed. (1985) The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press.
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And so with that most rare conception, nothing. What is it, after all, but something missed?
Richard Wilbur (b. 1921), U.S. poet. Lying (l. 33-34). . . Harvard Book of Contemporary American Poetry, The. Helen Vendler, ed. (1985) The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press.
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