Robert Burns Quotes

O Scotia! my dear, my native soil! For whom my warmest wish to Heaven is sent,
Robert Burns (1759-1796), Scottish poet. The Cotter's Saturday Night (l. 172-173). . . Family Book of Best Loved Poems, The. David L. George, ed. (1952) Doubleday & Company.
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Wi' joy unfeigned brothers and sisters meet, An' each for other's weelfare kindly spiers: The social hours, swift-winged, unnoticed fleet; Each tells the uncos that he sees or hears; The parents, partial, eye their hopeful years; Anticipation forward points the view:
Robert Burns (1759-1796), Scottish poet. The Cotter's Saturday Night (l. 37-42). . . Family Book of Best Loved Poems, The. David L. George, ed. (1952) Doubleday & Company.
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From scenes like these old Scotia's grandeur springs, That makes her loved at home, revered abroad; Princes and lords are but the breath of kings, "An honest man's the noblest work of God!"
Robert Burns (1759-1796), Scottish poet. The Cotter's Saturday Night (l. 163-166). . . Family Book of Best Loved Poems, The. David L. George, ed. (1952) Doubleday & Company.
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Let them cant about decorum Who have characters to lose!
Robert Burns (1759-1796), Scottish poet. repr. In Poetical Works, vol. 2, ed. William Scott Douglas (1891). "The Jolly Beggars," (1799).
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The time flew by, wi' tentless heed; Till, 'tween the late and early, Wi' sma' persuasion she agreed To see me thro' the barley.
Robert Burns (1759-1796), Scottish poet. The Rigs o' Barley (l. 5-8). . . Oxford Book of Scottish Verse, The. John MacQueen and Tom Scott, comps. (1966) Oxford University Press.
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Some hae meat and canna eat, And some wad eat that want it; But we hae meat, and we can eat, And sae the Lord be thanket.
Robert Burns (1759-1796), Scottish poet. Poetical Works, vol. 2, ed. William Scott Douglas (1891). "The Selkirk Grace," (c. 1790).
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The trumpets sound, the banners fly, The glittering spears are ranked ready; The shouts o' war are heard afar, The battle closes thick and bloody; But it's no the roar o' sea or shore Wad mak me langer wish to tarry; Nor shout o' war that's heard afar, Its leaving thee, my bonnie Mary.
Robert Burns (1759-1796), Scottish poet. The Silver Tassie (l. 9-16). . . New Oxford Book of English Verse, The, 1250-1950. Helen Gardner, ed. (1972) Oxford University Press.
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Ye ugly, creepin, blastit wonner, Detested, shunn'd by saunt an' sinner, How dare ye set your fit upon her, Sae fine a lady!
Robert Burns (1759-1796), Scottish poet. To a Louse (l. 7-10). . . Norton Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. M. H. Abrams, general ed. (5th ed., 1986) W. W. Norton & Company.
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O wad some Pow'r the giftie gie us To see oursels as others see us! It wad frae monie a blunder free us And foolish notion: What airs in dress an' gait wad lea'e us, And ev'n Devotion!
Robert Burns (1759-1796), Scottish poet. To a Louse (l. 43-48). . . Norton Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. M. H. Abrams, general ed. (5th ed., 1986) W. W. Norton & Company.
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Such is the fate of simple Bard, On life's rough ocean luckless starr'd:
Robert Burns (1759-1796), Scottish poet. To a Mountain Daisy (l. 37-38). . . World's Best Loved Poems, The. James Gilchrist Lawson, comp. (1927) Harper & Row.
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