Robert Burns Quotes

Wee image of my bonnie Betty, I fatherly will kiss and daut thee, As dear an' near my heart I set thee Wi' as guid will, As a' the priests had seen me get thee That's out o' hell.
Robert Burns (1759-1796), Scottish poet. A Poet's Welcome to His Love-begotten Daughter (l. 7-12). . . New Oxford Book of Eighteenth Century Verse, The. Roger Lonsdale, ed. (1984) Oxford University Press.
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Gude grant that thou may aye inherit Thy mither's person, grace, an' merit, An' thy poor worthless daddy's spirit, Without his failins; 'Twill please me mair to see and hear o't, Than stockit mailins.
Robert Burns (1759-1796), Scottish poet. A Poet's Welcome to His Love-begotten Daughter (l. 43-48). . . New Oxford Book of Eighteenth Century Verse, The. Roger Lonsdale, ed. (1984) Oxford University Press.
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O My Luve's like a red, red rose, That's newly sprung in June; O My Luve's like the melodie That's sweetly played in tune.
Robert Burns (1759-1796), Scottish poet. A Red, Red Rose (l. 1-4). . . New Oxford Book of English Verse, The, 1250-1950. Helen Gardner, ed. (1972) Oxford University Press.
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O my luve's like a red, red rose That's newly sprung in June; O my luve's like the melodie That's sweetly play'd in tune.
Robert Burns (1759-1796), Scottish poet. Poetical Works, vol. 2, ed. William Scott Douglas (1891). "A Red, Red Rose," st. 1 and 5, Johnson's Musical Museum, vol. 5 (1796).
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For auld lang syne, by dear, For auld lang syne, We'll tak a cup o' kindness yet For auld lang syne!
Robert Burns (1759-1796), Scottish poet. Auld Lang Syne (l. 5-8). . . New Oxford Book of English Verse, The, 1250-1950. Helen Gardner, ed. (1972) Oxford University Press.
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Should auld acquaintance be forgot And never brought to mind? ... We'll tak a cup o'kindness yet, For auld lang syne.
Robert Burns (1759-1796), Scottish poet. Auld Lang Syne, l. 1-2 and last two lines of chorus (1796). This traditional New Year's Eve song is one adapted by Burns from older poems and songs. "Auld Lang Syne" means "old long since" or "long ago."
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To see her is to love her, And love but her for ever; For Nature made her what she is, And never made anither!
Robert Burns (1759-1796), Scottish poet. Bonnie Lesley (l. 5-8). . . New Oxford Book of English Verse, The, 1250-1950. Helen Gardner, ed. (1972) Oxford University Press.
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The social, friendly, honest man, Whate'er he be, 'Tis he fulfils great Nature's plan, And none but he.
Robert Burns (1759-1796), Scottish poet. repr. In Poetical Works, vol. 1, ed. William Scott Douglas (1891). "Epistle to John Lapraik No.2," st. 15 (1786).
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Is there for honest poverty That hings his head, and a' that?
Robert Burns (1759-1796), Scottish poet. For A' That and A' That (l. 1-2). . . New Oxford Book of Eighteenth Century Verse, The. Roger Lonsdale, ed. (1984) Oxford University Press.
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The rank is but the guinea stamp— The man's the gowd for a' that!
Robert Burns (1759-1796), Scottish poet. For A' That and A' That (l. 7-8). . . New Oxford Book of Eighteenth Century Verse, The. Roger Lonsdale, ed. (1984) Oxford University Press.
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