Robert Burns Quotes

John Anderson my jo, John, We clamb the hill the gither; And mony a canty day, John, We've had wi' ane anither: Now we maun totter down, John, And hand in hand we'll go; And sleep the gither at the foot, John Anderson my Jo.
Robert Burns (1759-1796), Scottish poet. John Anderson, My Jo (l. 9-16). . . New Oxford Book of English Verse, The, 1250-1950. Helen Gardner, ed. (1972) Oxford University Press.
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But the cheerful Spring came kindly on And show'rs began to fall: John Barleycorn got up again And sore surpris'd them all.
Robert Burns (1759-1796), Scottish poet. John Barleycorn, st. 3.
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Now wae to thee, thou cruel lord, A bluidy man I trow thou be; For mony a heart thou hast made sair That ne'er did wrong to thine or thee.
Robert Burns (1759-1796), Scottish poet. Lament for Culloden (l. 13-16). . . Oxford Book of English Verse, The, 1250-1918. Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch, ed. (New ed., rev. and enl., 1939) Oxford University Press.
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Man's inhumanity to Man Makes countless thousands mourn!
Robert Burns (1759-1796), Scottish poet. repr. In Poetical Works, vol. 1, ed. William Scott Douglas (1891). "Man was made to Mourn," st. 7 (1786).
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O Mary, at thy window be, It is the wish'd, the trysted hour!
Robert Burns (1759-1796), Scottish poet. Mary Morison (l. 1-2). . . Burns; Complete Poems and Songs. James Kinsley, ed. (1969) Oxford University Press.
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O Mary, canst thou wreck his peace, Wha for thy sake wad gladly die? Or canst thou break that heart of his, Whase only faut is loving thee?
Robert Burns (1759-1796), Scottish poet. Mary Morison (l. 17-20). . . Burns; Complete Poems and Songs. James Kinsley, ed. (1969) Oxford University Press.
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My heart's in the Highlands, my heart is not here; My heart's in the Highlands a-chasing the deer; Chasing the wild deer, and following the roe: My heart's in the Highlands, wherever I go.
Robert Burns (1759-1796), Scottish poet. Poetical Works, vol. 1, ed. William Scott Douglas (1891). "My Heart's in the Highlands," st. 4, Johnson's Musical Museum, vol. 3 (1790). The lines are based on a traditional air.
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Of a' the airts the wind can blaw, I dearly like the west, For there the bonnie lassie lives, The lassie I lo'e best;
Robert Burns (1759-1796), Scottish poet. Of A' the Airts (l. 1-4). . . Oxford Book of English Verse, The, 1250-1918. Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch, ed. (New ed., rev. and enl., 1939) Oxford University Press.
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I see her in the dewy flowers, I see her sweet and fair: I hear her in the tunefu' birds, I hear her charm the air:
Robert Burns (1759-1796), Scottish poet. Of A' the Airts (l. 9-12). . . Oxford Book of English Verse, The, 1250-1918. Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch, ed. (New ed., rev. and enl., 1939) Oxford University Press.
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Or were I in the wildest waste, Sae black and bare, sae black and bare, The desert were a Paradise, If thou wert there, if thou wert there.
Robert Burns (1759-1796), Scottish poet. O, Wert Thou in the Cauld Blast (l. 9-12). . . New Oxford Book of English Verse, The, 1250-1950. Helen Gardner, ed. (1972) Oxford University Press.
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