Robert Herrick Quotes

O native country, repossessed by thee! For, rather than I'll to the West return, I'll beg of thee first here to have mine urn. Weak I am grown, and must in short time fall; Give thou my sacred relics burial.
Robert Herrick (1591-1674), British poet. His Return to London (l. 16-20). . . Faber Book of Poems and Places, The. Geoffrey Grigson, ed. (1980) Faber and Faber.
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Love me little, love me long, Is the burden of my song:
Robert Herrick (1591-1674), British poet. Love Me Little, Love Me Long (l. 1-2). . . Norton Anthology of Poetry, The. Alexander W. Allison and others, eds. (3d ed., 1983) W. W. Norton & Company.
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And air-like leave no pression to be seen Where'er they met, or parting place has been.
Robert Herrick (1591-1674), British poet. Lovers How They Come and Part (l. 7-8). . . Oxford Book of Light Verse, The. W. H. Auden, ed. (1938) Oxford University Press.
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Night makes no difference 'twixt the Priest and Clerk; Joan as my Lady is as good i'th'dark.
Robert Herrick (1591-1674), British poet, critic. No Difference i' th' Dark.
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Night makes no difference 'twixt the Priest and Clerk; Joan as my Lady is as good i' th' dark.
Robert Herrick (1591-1674), British poet, clergyman. repr. In The Poems of Robert Herrick, ed. L.C. Martin (1956). No Difference i' th' Dark, Hesperides (1648).
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I sing of brooks, of blossoms, birds and bowers, Of April, May, of June and July-flowers; I sing of May-poles, hock-carts, wassails, wakes, Of bridegrooms, brides and of their bridal cakes; I write of youth, of love, and have access By these to sing of cleanly wantonness;
Robert Herrick (1591-1674), British poet. The Argument of His Book (l. 1-6). . . Oxford Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. Frank Kermode and John Hollander, general eds. (1973) Oxford University Press (Also published as six paperback vols.: Medieval English Literature, J. B. Trapp, ed.; The Literature of Renaissance England, John Hollander and Frank Kermode, eds.; The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Martin Price, ed.; Romantic Poetry and Prose, Harold Bloom and Lionel Trilling, eds.; Victorian Prose and Poetry, Lionel Trilling and Harold Bloom, eds.; Modern British Literature, Frank Kermode and John Hollander, eds.).
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But if that Golden Age would come again, And Charles here rule as he before did reign;
Robert Herrick (1591-1674), British poet. The Bad Season Makes the Poet Sad (l. 7-8). . . Norton Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. M. H. Abrams, general ed. (5th ed., 1986) W. W. Norton & Company.
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I should delight to have my curls half drowned In Tyrian dews, and head with roses crowned, And once more yet (ere I am laid out dead) Knock at a star with my exalted head.
Robert Herrick (1591-1674), British poet. The Bad Season Makes the Poet Sad (l. 11-14). . . Norton Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. M. H. Abrams, general ed. (5th ed., 1986) W. W. Norton & Company.
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Feed him ye must, whose food fills you. And that this pleasure is like raine, Not sent ye for to drowne your paine, But for to make it spring againe.
Robert Herrick (1591-1674), British poet. The Hock-Cart, or Harvest Home (l. 52-55). . . Oxford Book of Seventeenth Century Verse, The. H. J. C. Grierson and G. Bullough, eds. (1934) Oxford University Press.
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You have beheld a smiling Rose When Virgins hands have drawn O'r it a Cobweb-Lawne: And here, you see, this Lilly shows, Tomb'd in a Christal stone, More faire in this transparent case, Than when it grew alone; And had but single grace.
Robert Herrick (1591-1674), British poet. The Lilly in a Christal (l. 1-8). . . Norton Anthology of Poetry, The. Alexander W. Allison and others, eds. (3d ed., 1983) W. W. Norton & Company.
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